Rivers Primary Academy, Livingstone Road, Blakenall, Walsall, WS3 1LY
Part of Windsor Academy Trust
Menu
religious education at rivers primary academy

Religious Education

Our Religious Education curriculum by year group is outlined below.

Key Stage 1 must study RE for at least 36 hours across the school year (12 hours per term) and Key Stage 2 must study for at least 45 hours (15 hours per term).

 

Year 1

Focus Autumn term Spring term Summer term
Christianity and Islam

How do people celebrate?

Find out what special times are celebrated.  Learn what happens at a celebration.  Learn that a birthday is a celebration of us as special people. 

 Become aware that special celebrations involve special objects and clothes and help people to share special feelings.  Develop awareness of celebrations of key life events for Muslim families, beginning to learn about the diversity of faith traditions. They will think about their own names and their meanings.  Learn about different ways of celebrating at a wedding, including the promises Christians make when they get married. 

Have the chance to play based on some of the learning they have done. 

Think and talk about their own big days and those of others. 

They notice that people celebrate different things and in different ways. 

They use an increasingly wide vocabulary of emotions to describe what happens on special days. 

They notice similarities and differences in the ways people celebrate.

How do we say thank you for the earth?

To recognise that some questions are so big they are mysterious. These questions are sometimes very interesting and we learn a lot from them. 

 Learn about their own abilities to be creative, and the abilities of other children; recognise some achievements and the emotions and feelings associated with achievements. 

Show an awareness of stories of the formative events of some religious traditions – in this case the story of God’s creation from Jewish and Christian scripture in Genesis 1. 

Identify and discuss any questions they may have about caring for the Earth, themselves, where life comes from and beliefs about God and the Earth. 

Recognise that people have different thoughts about these kinds of questions and to see the fascination of the questions for themselves. 

Show an awareness of stories of origins from some religious sources and traditions. Identify and discuss any questions they may have about the stories, their meanings and the children’s own ideas, including questions about God. 

Learn about Harvest Thanksgiving celebrations. Consider how they might show they are thankful for the good things of the earth. 

Use their own skills in art and RE to create a response to the work that they can be proud of, working cooperatively and creatively. Pupils work retells the story, responding sensitively to questions in it.

What can we learn from stories and prayers about Jesus?

Become aware that people have different kinds and qualities of power. 

Know that Jesus taught others how to pray.  Know that the Lord’s Prayer is an important Christian prayer, used by millions. 

Reflect on the meaning of the Lord’s Prayer through speaking, listening and creative work. 

Consider whether praying is a powerful activity. 

Begin to understand that Christians believe Jesus used the power gained from prayer to help him follow God’s path. 

Describe the story of Jesus and the Ten Lepers.Consider thoughtfully the ideas of power and prayer in the story. 

Develop awareness that Christians believe prayer is a source of power from God. 

Reflect on their powers and how they might use them. 

Consider ideas about praying thoughtfully for themselves. 

Year 2

Focus Autumn term Spring term Summer term
Christianity and Islam

A World of Festivals?

Pupils should learn:

  • celebrations are an important part of many people’s lives religions often have celebrations that happen at a set time once a year the story of Rama and Sita
  • that the idea of good winning over bad is linked with the story of Rama and Sita and the festival of Diwali ways in which Hindu people celebrate 
  • how the symbols of light and dark are associated with Diwali
  • the story of Chanukah
  • that the story of Chanukah might throw up some Puzzling questions
  • ways in which Jewish people celebrate Chanukah ways in which actions of Jewish people at Chanukah help them to remember a miracle within the Chanukah story 
  • the nativity story
  • that Christians believe Jesus was a special baby, The Divine’s son, who was sent by The Divine.
  • that gifts do not have to be material items that Christians see Jesus as a gift from The Divine for human beings
  • that the gift of Jesus and the presents given by the magi are reasons why Christians give gifts at Christmas that the ways in which people celebrate are linked to the reasons why people are celebrating that people celebrate in a range of ways (including using cards, candles, carrying out Actions, remembering stories, giving gifts, eating foods, using symbols) and that there are reasons for many of these. 

What does Easter mean for Christians?

To develop an awareness of the potential for and signs of new life in physical life.

To become aware of examples of new life found in stories about Jesus.

To think and talk about ideas such as ‘fresh start’ or ‘new life’ with adults and other pupils.

 Become familiar with some of the major events of the Easter story.

Begin to understand that Christians believe Jesus died and came back to life to give new life to his followers.

To retell an outline of the Easter story.

To identify and express feelings through role play, story and activity.

That there were many characters involved in the story who each had their part to play.

That the story is about the death of Jesus and the Empty Tomb, the beginning of Christianity.

To enjoy play and thinking about the story.

To develop their creative skills while working with others.

To use the Easter story as an opportunity for thinking about new life.What do people do on a special day such as Easter Sunday?

To know that Easter is a Christian celebration of Jesus’ resurrection.

To think about what Christians believe about heaven.

To understand that Easter is about new life.

To think about the fact that we all need fresh starts sometimes.

To understand that Easter is about new life, saying sorry and hope.

To think about the fact that we all need fresh starts sometimes. 

To develop awareness of potential for and signs of new life in physical life.

To become aware of examples of new life found in stories about Jesus.

To think and talk about ideas such as ‘fresh start’ or ‘new life’ with adults and other pupils.

Become familiar with some of the major events of the Easter story.

Begin to understand that Christians believe Jesus died and came back to life to give new life to his followers.

To retell an outline of the Easter story. 

To identify and express feelings through role play, story and activity.

That there were many characters involved in the story who each had their part to play.

 That the story is about the death of Jesus and the Empty Tomb, the beginning of Christianity.

To enjoy play and thinking about the story.

To develop their creative skills while working with others.

To use the Easter story as an opportunity for thinking about new life.What do people do on a special day such as Easter Sunday?

To know that Easter is a Christian celebration of Jesus’ resurrection. 

To think about what Christians believe about heaven.

To understand that Easter is about new life. To think about the fact that we all need fresh starts sometimes.

To understand that Easter is about new life, saying sorry and hope.

To think about the fact that we all need fresh starts sometimes.

Beginning to learn from Islam 

To think about kindness to animals.

To identify that Prophet Muhammad is a special or holy leader for Muslim people.

To respond thoughtfully to a story of the Prophet by thinking about values and behaviour.

To understand that ‘special’ place has to do with how an individual feels about the place, and this may not be the same for everyone.

To begin to think about the Mosque as a special, clean place of prayer for Muslims.

To become familiar some things that pupils may encounter at the mosque which indicate its use and importance.

To develop an awareness of the mosque as a special/sacred place for Muslims

Choose some words that describe a Muslim special place.

Think of some feelings that go with a special place. There are many mosques in our local community. There are many other religious buildings too. 

Pupils will be taught to see simple links between their special places and the Mosque in Islam that the Qur’an was revealed to the prophet Muhammad about the Shahadah some Muslim beliefs about God the Qur’an guides Muslims in their daily life.

To express their understanding of sacred writings for themselves.

To think about the most important words.

To reflect on events in their own live and link them with festival and celebration in Islam.

That a Mosque is a sacred place for Muslims About some of the important features of a Mosque About what a Mosque feels like and looks like.

Why Muslims come to a Mosque, what they do there and how they care for It.

Children will learn that the words of the shahadah, ‘God is most great. There is no God but Allah and Muhammad is his prophet’ are very important to Muslims.

They will learn about how these words are whispered to new babies, and shouted from minarets at prayer times.

They will think about what Important words they would whisper to a new baby, or shout from, the rooftops.

Pupils will think about what they have learned in this unit of work and suggestions from their own ideas what matters most.

They will ask and answer questions about what matters to Muslims and what matters to them.

Year 3

Focus Autumn term Spring term Summer term
Christianity, Islam and Sikhism 

Holy buildings and sacred spaces

To think about kindness to animals.

To identify that Prophet Muhammad is a special or holy leader for Muslim people.

To respond thoughtfully to a story of the Prophet by thinking about values and behaviour.

To understand that ‘special’ place has to do with how an individual feels about the place, and this may not be the same for everyone.

To begin to think about the Mosque as a special, clean place of prayer for Muslims.

To become familiar some things that pupils may encounter at the mosque which indicate its use and importance.

To develop awareness of the mosque as a special /sacred place for Muslims.

To choose some words that describe a Muslim special place.

Think of some feelings that go with a special place. There are many mosques in our local community

There are many other religious buildings too.

Pupils will be taught to see simple links between their special places and the Mosque in Islam.

Pupils will learn: that the Qur’an was revealed to the prophet Muhammad about the Shahadah some Muslim beliefs about God the Qur’an guides Muslims in their daily life.

To express their understanding of sacred writings for themselves.

To think about the most important words.

To reflect on events in their own life and link them with festival and celebration in Islam.

That a Mosque is a sacred place.

Learn about some of the important features of a Mosque.

How and why are holy books important? 

Pupils should learn:

  • the story of Mary Jones 
  • that for many people there is a difference between a holy book and a favourite/special book
  • reasons why the Bible is important to Christians
  • that stories are found within the Bible (and know a range of these)
  • that stories of Jesus are found in the New Testament 
  • that the themes of Bible stories are important
  • at least 1 Bible story in detail and know what the important themes are within should learn... 
  • to state and justify opinions 
  • some teachings of Jesus that are recorded in the Bible
  • what a Christian might learn from Jesus’ teachings
  • that the Bible is used in different places and situations
  • about acts of worship that are inspired by the Bible
  • about how the Bible is used at church and elsewhere
  • ways in which Muslims treat the Qur’an and reasons for these
  • the story of the first revelation of the Qur’an
  • how important the Qur’an is to Muslims
  • some of the teachings in the Qur’an
  • that there are similarities between teachings in the Qur’an and the Bible
  • that we all have influences upon our lives
  • to apply knowledge of religious teachings in holy books to create their own book of guidance for life.

Why do people make pilgrimages? 

Pupils will learn: 

  • that some places are of particular significance in the religious life of some people
  • that humans are often inspired by places
  • to think for themselves about the idea of ‘Inspiring Places’
  • that an inspiring place may have natural, historic or Religious significance.
  • to understand that a journey is part of our everyday life.
  • to reflect on their ‘life’ journey so far. That Christians, Muslims and Hindus have a religious journey to take
  • learn about the importance of places of pilgrimage to Hindus.
  • consider essential features of pilgrimages in discussion, using ranking and sorting activities to process information.
  • enquire into questions ‘who, what, where, when, how, why, what if...’ to pursue their investigations.
  • to understand the importance of a variety of places to Hindus.
  • to explore in detail two Hindu places of pilgrimage The importance of the story of Ibrahim and Ishmail to Muslims on Hajj
  • the importance of Hajj to a member of the Muslim community
  • to reflect on experiences of peace and forgiveness The meanings, symbolism stories and significance of Hajj practice
  • that pilgrimage may have a deep impact on Peoples way of life
  • to explore and consider the meaning of the birth of Jesus to Christians
  • they will be able to find out about Bethlehem today, including as a place of pilgrimage
  • pupils will be challenged to think for themselves about questions such as: what does Christmas really mean? Would it be more meaningful to celebrate Christmas in Bethlehem than anywhere else on earth
  • that people's lives follow different paths in the search for meaning and purpose
  • the importance of pilgrimage and the associated certain practices for members of faith communities.

Year 4

Focus Autumn term Spring term Summer term
Christianity, Islam and Sikhism 

Muslim Ways of Living of Living – Keeping 5 pillars

To reflect on the beliefs, values and practices that are important in their own lives and in the school community and how these values are expressed;

To consider their own beliefs about God’s character To understand Muslim belief and teaching about Allah. To explain the key beliefs of Muslims and how these affect the way Muslims choose to behave

To learn about Salah and its importance

To think about the feelings that go with Submission and with prayer

To learn about the practice and impact of Zakah.

To think about generosity, fairness and equality in the light of the practices of Zakah.

To learn about the practice of fasting and the month of Ramadan.

Muslims and Christians: who is inspiring?

To think carefully about the idea of leadership and inspiration.

To describe inspiring leaders for themselves.

To identify and describe the qualities of a good leader. 

To reflect on their own experience of being a leader and a follower. 

To make links between religious leaders and other kinds of leadership.

To understand the meanings of some stories of the Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) 

To reflect on the meaning of the stories. 

To understand the importance of some Hadith for Muslims

To learn that Muslims make no visual images of the Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). 

To make links between the stories of the Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) and the way Muslims live today.

Christian Aid and Islamic Relief: Can they change the world? 

To ask and respond to questions about fairness and justice in the World.

To understand and respond to some ideas from Christian and Islamic sources, and to guess what impact they might have.

Pupils should learn:

  • to describe the work of two religious charities involved in global poverty issues;
  • to make links between the beliefs and teachings of Islam and Christianity and the work of the two charities;
  • to show their understanding of the issues of justice, fairness and poverty that the charities address
  • to identify the qualities needed to take action to bring about what is right and good
  • to reflect upon and express their own ideas and beliefs about treating others with justice and love in light of their learning
  • to evaluate charity websites.

Year 5

Focus Autumn term Spring term Summer term
Christianity, Islam and Hinduism

What is it like to be a Hindu? 

To learn about Hindu communities in Walsall and the West Midlands.

To learn about symbols and the ways they are used in religions.

To learn about Hindu artefacts, and the ways they are connected to Hindu worship and beliefs.

To understand Hindu beliefs about God, Understood through the Trimurti 

To learn about ways in which Hindu murtis (images) Communicate some Hindu ideas about the nature or character of God or ultimate reality. 

To raise questions and set up an enquiry into a religious question.

The importance of worship in the lives of most Hindus  Ways in which many Hindus use images and actions in worship in their home shrines and at the Mandir  Ways in which the senses are used to show that things are special.

To know about some of the things Hindus do within their families.

To find out about some Hindu artefacts that might be found in a home shrine.

To think about how Hindu people thank the gods and goddesses in their home worship, and about the value of thankfulness.

To reflect for themselves on the search for and value of thankfulness.

The story behind Divali, its meaning for Hindus and ways in which it is celebrated in Walsall today.

To express ideas about good and bad; light and darkness; celebration and joy.

To learn about the symbol of light and the idea of winning over darkness.

To use prioritising skills to make sense of Divali symbols.

Christian and Hindu beliefs and questions on life’s journey

To use religious vocabulary to explain some of the ways in which Hindus describe God, identifying beliefs that are similar in different religions.  reflect on why there are many ideas about God and express their own understanding of God through words, symbols and the arts. 

To ask questions and suggest some responses about what others believe, showing awareness that not all questions can be answered.

To know and understand that Hinduism describes life as a journey, identifying 16 stages or samskaras using religious vocabulary explain what happens in a Sacred Thread ceremony and why it is important for some Hindu young people using religious vocabulary. 

To describe and explain what happens in a Hindu wedding ceremony and the symbols used to express their own feelings and thoughts about growing up and taking on responsibility.

To learn that many forms of music are used by the Christian communities to express worship, beliefs and faith. To understand how religious beliefs, ideas and feelings can be expressed in a variety of forms of music.

To explain different forms of the symbolism and use of music in Christian worship.

To identify and recognise different types of religious music and its symbolism.

Pupils will discover and explore links between stories about Jesus’ resurrection and Christian beliefs about life after death.

Create a statement of own beliefs about life after death reflecting on ideas from at least two religions studied. Explain what has inspired and influenced them to form this view.

To suggest answers to questions about the value of having rituals to mark important events.

To use religious vocabulary describe and explain why commitment ceremonies such as confirmation and marriage are important to some Christians.

To create a statement of their own beliefs about life after death reflecting on ideas from Christianity and at least one other religion they have studied.

To use religious vocabulary describe and explain why beliefs, rituals and ceremonies are important to religious believers. 

To express their own feelings and thoughts about growing up and taking on responsibility.

Commitments and meanings – Hindus, Muslims and Christians

To use speaking and listening strategy to clarify the Commitments that matter most to each pupil, and explore the fact that different people have different commitments.

To think for themselves about what difference our commitments make 

Pupils learn:

  • to reflect on the beliefs, values and practices that are important in their own lives and in the school community and how these values are expressed;
  • to understand Muslim belief and teaching about Allah.
  • to explain the key beliefs of Muslims and how these affect the way Muslims choose to behave 
  • how Muslims express commitment to doing good through the ritual of ‘Stoning the Devil’ when they go on pilgrimage to Makkah
  • they will be enabled to respond sensitively to the values and commitments supported by the Muslim community
  • to understand the life and significance of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh).
  • to consider how the practice of Islam in Britain today, including local practice, follows the example and teaching of the Prophet Muhammad.
  • to reflect on the question: who influences me? What are my commitments?
  • begin to understand the Christian belief in sacrificial love as exemplified in the life and teachings of Jesus.
  • to explore the significance of the Last Supper
  • to consider the idea that Jesus came as a servant or sacrifice, not as a ruler or king 
  • to describe some links between the Last Supper and the Holy Communion
  • become familiar with Christian examples of sacrifice as exemplified in the life story or stance of a modern Christian or a saint.
  • to think carefully about the Christian ideas of values such as love and forgiveness.
  • to continue to think about the idea that values show in what people do; they demonstrate commitment.
  • to begin to understand that the impact of our values can make people happy – or unhappy
  • to retell stories about an inspirational person, explaining why their lives might be considered inspiring  
  • to use religious vocabulary to describe aspects of lives and teachings of inspiring leaders and inspirational people, giving examples of how these have influenced the lives of followers.
  • to describe what ‘sewa’ means and what some acts of sewa may be. 
  • to investigate and interpret how one charity is inspired by teachings related to sewa in Hinduism.
  • to think for themselves about Diwali, and what it means to celebrate
  • to discuss difficulties and evaluate ideas surrounding being committed to celebrating a Hindu festival in modern Britain
  • to notice and understand similarities and differences between Christian, Hindu and Muslim commitments
  • to explore and express ideas of their own about commitments.

Year 6

Focus Autumn term Spring term Summer term
Christianity, Islam and Hinduism 

How do we express spiritual ideas through the arts?

To be able to use a working definition or description of the spiritual, e.g ‘spiritual is about the deepest ideas we have about life’, or ‘spiritual is to do with how we relate to ourselves, God the Earth and other people.’ 

To notice that different people find that different things are spiritual at different times.

Pupils will learn to think about how Sikh art and Architecture express the beliefs and ways of Sikh religion.

They enquire into which examples studied are the best spiritual expression of the Sikh path.

Pupils explore Muslim belief as expressed in art, architecture and poetry, weighing up the ways in which these forms express Islamic ideas and ideals.

They consider for themselves the power and spirituality of the Islamic examples. 

They ask and respond to questions about spirituality and morality. 

To explore music as a means of expressing worship. To discuss the significance of this music to Christian communities

To respond personally to the music they have heard. To explore the use of a variety of objects in times of reflection; 

To develop skills of imagination in making sense of symbols.

To match feelings to colours.

To explore the meanings of colour in the church year. To explore the meaning behind the use of banners and stained glass windows in churches.

To explore the symbolism associated with icons.

To enjoy the variety of artistic forms used in Christian worship, and to think about them for themselves. 

To explore the meaning of a Bible story or a Christian belief through the use of mystery plays. 

To work creatively and purposefully in a team to create a simple drama performance.

To increase awareness of the ways biblical stories express beliefs.

To reflect for themselves on their own ideas about spiritual life and self expression.

To respond to the challenge of self expression of the spiritual in a way they choose. 

What matters most?

To explore the concepts of being naughty and being good in terms of actions, words and thoughts.

To think about the idea of a code for living and to examine whether they are living by a code themselves. 

Begin to understand that not all people are religious, that non religious people can have codes for living that don’t refer to god, and that a person can be ‘good without god’.

To use dilemmas for learning, noticing and reacting to difficult cases of right and wrong, good and bad.

To build up an understanding of the concepts of fairness, justice, forgiveness and free choice through speaking and listening and drama work.

To think carefully about the Christian ideas of values such as love and forgiveness. 

To continue to think about the idea that values show in what people do. 

To begin to understand that the impact of our values can make people happy – or unhappy.

To use a speaking and listening strategy to clarify the values that matter most to each pupil, and explore the fact that different people have different values. 

To understand more deeply that peace is valued by both Humanists and Christians, but peace is not always easy to build. 

To deepen their understanding of the impact of values on life.

To draw learning about values together and express ideas of their own about how values can make a community happier.

What can we learn from religions about temptation?

Pupils will be enabled to learn to think carefully about temptation and the ways we choose what is right or wrong.

Pupils will be enabled to:  predict the consequences of good and bad choices,  explore and take opportunities for their own moral development.

Pupils will be enabled to compare the consequences of what we say and do for other people, thinking about the impact of our choices. 

Pupils can learn how and why forgiveness works to mend broken friendships or relationships, and be aware that forgiveness is not easy, but costly.

Pupils will be enabled to apply their own emotional intelligence to moral dilemmas and questions of good and bad. 

Pupils will be enabled to respond sensitively to different needs and wants, taking account of the values supported by the Muslim and / or Christian communities.

Pupils will be enabled to use religious stories as a starting point for reflection and discussion of their own attitudes.

Pupils will be able to sum up their learning about and from Christianity and Islam, and to apply ideas about good and bad choices and temptation for themselves.