Rivers Primary Academy, Livingstone Road, Blakenall, Walsall, WS3 1LY
Part of Windsor Academy Trust
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History

At Rivers Primary Academy, we are historians!

We want our pupils to love history and we inspire them to aspire to be archaeologists, museum curators, research analysts, archivists or paleontologists. We want our pupils to remember their history learning and embrace the historical opportunities they are presented with.

Our history curriculum forms part of the WAT ASPIRE curriculum: Our Aspirations are our possibilities - believe you can and you will!

Intent:

Our curriculum develops pupils' aspirations so that they strive to be the best that they can be. We carefully plan the subject knowledge, skills and vocabulary, coupled with specific Aspire character virtues and learner skills, so that our pupils have the tools to be successful in learning and in life. Our history Aspire curriculum promotes curiosity and a love and thirst for learning. We aim to enrich our pupils' time in our school with memorable experiences.

Implementation:

Our history Aspire curriculum has been carefully built and the learning opportunities and assessment milestones for each year group crafted to ensure progression and repetition in terms of embedding key learning -  knowledge and skills are mapped out with threshold concepts. Each theme starts with a ‘big question’  and enquiry is further integrated into our history themes and linked to the threshold concepts. Long-term curriculum maps have been developed with other schools within Windsor Academy trust. Meaningful links across subjects have been made where appropriate. Medium Term plans are written collaboratively and personalised locally where needed. Knowledge organisers identify key knowledge and help pupils with remembering more.  

Impact:

We aim for all of our children to leave Rivers Primary equipped with the history skills and knowledge that will enable them to be ready for the curriculum at KS3 and for life as an adult in the wider world. Cumulative Quizzes inform the teacher about the impact of the current learning and demonstrate pupils’ retention of previous knowledge. Key Assessment Task (KATs) allow the teacher to see how the knowledge and skills gained can be translated into understanding. These are centred around a deep-thinking question, known as the ‘Big Question’ and are explicitly linked to the threshold concept/s. Reviews in history include work scrutinies, learning walks, pupil and staff voice. All of this information is gathered and reviewed. It is used to inform further curriculum developments and provision is adapted accordingly.

 

At Rivers Primary Academy, we Inspire to Aspire.

Our Curriculum Overview

 WAT Curriculum Milestones and Threshold Concepts:

 

Year 1

Year 2

End of KS1 (NC)

Threshold Concepts 







Sequence events in their own lives and that of their family.


Understand and discuss the differences between old and new. 


Describe main events and changes.

To describe the events of the Great Fire of London and the impact that it has on life today. 

Describe a timeline of events beyond living memory. 


Identify and discuss differences in the way people lived in the past.


To understand the events surrounding the Titanic and explain why it happened and who was affected. 


Explain and describe achievements of some significant people from the past.

 

To investigate and interpret the past 

Observe or handle evidence to ask questions and find answers to questions about the past Ask questions such as: What was it like for people? What happened? How long ago? 


Discuss some of the different ways the past has been represented.

Use artefacts, pictures, stories, online sources and databases to find out about the past. 


Report  some of the different ways the past has been represented.


Compare two versions of past events.

Ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. 


Understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.

To build an overview of world history 

Describe historical events. 


Describe significant people from the past. 


Begin to recognise that there are reasons why people in the past acted as they did.

Describe historical events. 


Identify and describe significant people from the past. 


Recognise and discuss that there are reasons why people in the past acted as they did.



Events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally.


Significant historical events, people and places in their own locality


The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. 


Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods.

To understand chronology 

Place events and artefacts in order on a timeline. 


Label timelines with words or phrases such as: past, present, older and newer. 


Recount changes that have occurred in their own lives. 


Use dates where appropriate.



Place events and artefacts in order on a timeline. 


Label timelines


Use dates




Changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life.


Pupils should develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. 


They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. 

To communicate historically 

Use words and phrases such as: a long time ago, recently, when my parents/carers were children, years, to describe the passing of time.


Show an understanding of concepts such as monarchy and war and peace.

Use words and phrases such as: a long time ago, recently, when my parents/carers were children, years, decades and centuries to describe the passing of time.


Show an understanding of the concept of nation and a nation’s history. 


Show an understanding of concepts such as civilisation, monarchy, parliament, democracy, and war and peace.

Ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. 


Understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.




     

 

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

End of KS2 (NC)

Threshold Concepts 






Understand what the Victorian era is and when it is.


Understand that their locality has changed since Victorian times and can give examples. 


Understand the importance of the Victorian era and how it has influenced our lives.


Identify a time period on a timeline.



To identify how aspects of Henry VIII’s reign has impacted our lives today. 


Identify a time period on a timeline.


Describe the main events and changes in Britain during the Tudor time.  


Understand how the transfer of power during the Tudor time affected lives. 

To identify the impact of the Stone Age, Bronze Age and Iron age on early Britain.


To describe and compare what life was like during the Stone Age, Bronze Age and Iron age in early Britain.


Identify connections and contrasts between the Anglo Saxons and the Vikings. 


To understand change over time. 

Identify how aspects of Ancient Greek life impact on our lives today. 


Describe main events and changes in Ancient Greece.


Describe the main events and changes in Britain during the Roman occupation.


Identify how aspects of Roman Britain impact on our lives today. 




Identify different sources that tell us what life was like in Ancient Egypt. 


To know where Ancient Egyptian civilisation fits in on a timeline. 


To compare similarities and differences between the Ancient Egyptians and Mayans.

 

 

To investigate and interpret the past 

Use evidence to ask questions and find answers to questions about the past.


Use more than one source of evidence for historical enquiry in order to gain a more accurate understanding of history. 


Suggest causes and consequences of some of the main events and changes in history

Suggest suitable sources of evidence for historical enquiries. 


Describe different accounts of a historical event, explaining some of the reasons why the accounts may differ. 


Suggest causes and consequences of some of the main events and changes in history

Use sources of evidence to deduce information about the past.


Select suitable sources of evidence, giving reasons for choices.


Understand that no single source of evidence gives the full answer to questions about the past

Use sources of information to form testable hypotheses about the past. 


Seek out and analyse a wide range of evidence in order to justify claims about the past. 


Show an awareness of the concept of propaganda and how historians must understand the social context of evidence studied. 


Refine lines of enquiry as appropriate

They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.


They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

To build an overview of world history

A local history study.

A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066 (Victorians).


The changing power of monarchs (Tudors).






Describe changes that have happened in the locality of the school throughout history.


Compare some of the times studied with those of other areas of interest around the world. 


Describe the social, ethnic, cultural or religious diversity of past society.



Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age.


Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots.


The Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor.



Give a broad overview of life in Britain from ancient until medieval times.


Compare some of the times studied with those of other areas of interest around the world. 


Describe the social, ethnic, cultural or religious diversity of past society.


Describe the characteristic features of the past, including ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children.

The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain.


Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world. 







Compare some of the times studied with those of the other areas of interest around the world.


Describe the social, ethnic, cultural or religious diversity of past society.


Describe the characteristic features of the past, including ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children.

The achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of Ancient Egypt.


A non-European society that provides contrasts with British history – Mayan civilization c. AD 900.



Compare some of the times studied with those of the other areas of interest around the world. 


Describe the social, ethnic, cultural or religious diversity of past society.


Describe the characteristic features of the past, including ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children.

 They should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance. 

To understand chronology

Place events, artefacts and historical figures on a timeline using dates.


Use dates and terms to describe events.

Place events, artefacts and historical figures on a timeline using dates. 


Use dates and terms to describe events.


Understand the concept of change over time, representing this, along with evidence, on a timeline. 

Understand the concepts of continuity and change over time, representing them, along with evidence, on a timeline. 


Use dates and terms accurately in describing events.

Understand the concepts of continuity and change over time, representing them, along with evidence, on a timeline. 


Use dates and terms accurately in describing events.


Identify periods of rapid change in history and contrast them with times of relatively little change. 


Describe the main changes in a period of history (using terms such as: social, religious, political, technological and cultural)

Pupils should continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study

To communicate historically

Use appropriate historical vocabulary to communicate, including:

  • dates 
  • time period 
  • change 
  • chronology.

Begin to use literacy, numeracy and computing skills to communicate information about the past.

Use appropriate historical vocabulary to communicate, including:

  • dates 
  • time period 
  • era 
  • change 
  • chronology.

Use literacy, numeracy and computing skills to a good standard in order to communicate information about the past.

Use appropriate historical vocabulary to communicate, including: 

  • dates 
  • time period 
  • era
  • chronology continuity
  • change
  • century
  • decade 
  • legacy.

Begin to use literacy, numeracy and computing skills to an exceptional standard in order to communicate information about the past.

Use appropriate historical vocabulary to communicate, including: 

  • dates 
  • time period 
  • era
  • chronology continuity
  • change
  • century
  • decade 
  • legacy.

Begin to use literacy, numeracy and computing skills to an exceptional standard in order to communicate information about the past.

Use original ways to present information and ideas.

They should note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms.